The importance of Queen Victoria to Canada

Via national post

 

“Queen Victoria took a great and helpful interest in Canada throughout her reign, which began at the time of the Gilbert and Sullivan rebellions of Mackenzie and Papineau in 1837. She sent the Prince of Wales (later King Edward VII) to Canada on a visit in 1860, during which he opened the Victoria Bridge in Montreal, then the longest bridge in the world, and laid the corner-stone for the Parliament buildings in Ottawa. She sent her son-in-law, the Marquess of Lorne, to serve as governor-general of Canada from 1878 to 1883, and always treated Macdonald and Sir Wilfrid Laurier with great respect when they came to England. They served her as prime minister of the Dominion or co-premier of the United Province for a total of 43 years….

 

 

Conrad Black sums up eloquently Queen Victoria’s necessary connection to Canada. As well, why she deserves a yearly celebration of her birth.

Heritage Minutes Back in Style

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Via globe and mail

In the beginning, there was Valour Road, Jacques Plante and the Underground Railroad. Then Nellie McClung, Superman and the Halifax Explosion. Soon, dozens more. By 1995, four years after their launch, Heritage Minutes were a Canadian institution: 60-second snapshots of cultural history thrust into TV screens from coast to coast to coast, injecting education into entertainment.

 

Celebrate Magna Carta In 2015

From Daniel Hannan

Lord Denning, most celebrated of all twentieth-century jurists, declared: “Magna Carta is the greatest constitutional document of all times—the foundation of the freedom of the individual against the arbitrary authority of the despot.”

The few copies that survive from the thirteenth century are mostly housed in our cathedrals, tended like the relics that were removed at the Reformation. One is on display in the Australian Parliament in Canberra. Another hangs next to the Declaration of Independence in the National Archives in Washington, D.C. Here, in short, is the Anglosphere’s unifying text.

 

As an aside, there is also a campaign underway to bring a copy of the Magna Carta to Canada, for its anniversary next year.

 

Photo by Mike Licht, NotionsCapital.com

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